Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 12
KQED (PBS) 5
KRCB (PBS) 4
KCSM (PBS) 3
KPIX (CBS) 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
( more )
SPONSOR
LANGUAGE
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 243 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
, dwight eisenhower. he's introduced by susan eisenhower, granddaughter at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> what an honor and treat to be at the eisenhower institute and especially an honor to have susan introduced me. you know, families can be a little touchy about the great man and their family, but the eisenhower's were amazing with me. john, susan, david are completely open, not defensive, which is unusual. incredibly helpful and i could not have done this book without them. so thank you, susan. six weeks after dwight eisenhower became president, stalin died. paik caught together top advisers and officials in that, what's the plan? .. is >> little bit like colonel sanders of kentucky fried chicken. was clearly a figure. ike was rooting for the general, the head of the red army was ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower sent his son john out to do a little spying. john seidel up to him. things are not as they seem. president eisenhower did not find out who was really in charge until the fifth day of the con
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
recounts the tenure of america's 34th president, dwight eisenhower. mr. thomas is introduced by susan eisenhower the granddaughter of the dwight eisenhower at the eisenhower institute in washington d.c.. this is about 50 minutes. .. >> the answer was there is no plan. i blew up, not for the first or last time, and said, how can it be the head of the soviet union dies, and we have no contingency plan. it was criminal, said the president. the truth was the united states and the other western nations had very little idea of what was happening behind the iron curtain. two years later at the first summit meeting of the cold war era at geneva in 1955, the united states still did not know who was running the soviet union. they sent four leaders, one tall white man in a white suit with a white goatee who looked like colonel sanders from kentucky fried chicken, clearly, a figure head. the head of the red army, ike's ally in defeating the nazis in world war ii. eisenhower spent his son, john, to do some spying. subdued and shaken, just whispered, "things are not as they seem." presidentiz
MSNBC
Dec 25, 2012 5:00am PST
president eisenhower evan thomas. >> what a great way to start it because dwight eisenhower, you always see presidents rise, you see presidents fall, and over the past four, five, six seven years i have found myself going back and reading ambrose's "eisenhower" over and over again. talk about -- let's start with eisenhower right now, my favorite president. it may change after i read your biography. >> exactly. or after we hear from meacham. >> or hear that he would kick dogs instead of go golf. but talk about eisenhower derided as dull and worthless and now we look back and say, my god, what he did over eight years pretty unbelievable. >> one of the great shots of all time was the kennedys on eisenhower. to make jack kennedy look young and vibrant, you had to make eisenhower look old and dull. that stuck. but what people didn't realize was that with a hidden hand, as a professor once said, he was doing a lot. what he was really doing was keeping us out of war. and you don't get credit for things that don't happen. but he for eight years, got us out -- we were in korea when we got in, he
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 5:00pm EST
sustain a book but there are also some wonderful secondary characters. obviously dwight eisenhower himself who comes off as a sad and tragic figure in this book. he starts off as the kind of general on a white horse to comes back to redeem the republic and slap back corruption of the truman administration and return the republic to its ideal values but also someone who just winds up going further and further to the right and placating the right within his own party and be trading some of his own political principles. the relationship between nixon and eisenhower is a curious one and has a father/suns for development and almost oedipal struggle going on. a lot of pundits and to the book including walter that men and joe alsop who hoped eisenhower will be more what eisenhower actually has become. there is pat nixon. pat nixon is up from to dick nixon literally during the speech he is sitting watching him nervously not sure what he is going to be saying that. she is crucial to the strategy of making her husband into a normal looking guy. she writes a slew of articles where she talks about her
MSNBC
Dec 27, 2012 6:00am PST
synonymous, there lessons to be learned from dwight eisenhower's success in working by the opposing party. chuck recently sat down with a claim biographer and journalist and discussed his new book on the 34th president, the who gave us our highways. >> for years, dwight david eisenhower was viewed as a man who was disengaged and bumbling and he loved to golf other than govern. according to a book, ike's bluff, his secret battle to save the world. beneath that was an exterior was a man and this former general's greatest victory were the wars he did not fight. joining me now is journalist and author evan thomas. dwight eisenhower it's said that he was the only president we had who the title president was not the greatest title he ever had. >> when are he quit, he wanted to revert to being general. jfk couldn't believe it? why would he want to give up president for a title. he was an army man and served in his army. >> why did he get a reputation for being this disengaged president? >> partly by his own design. he felt he could be more effective by not being a giant ego himself and let
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 4:00pm EST
toyed d. eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time the income then-president, that year john f. kennedy and his wife, there are leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing -- another thing that takes place on inauguration morning, and this will happen again coming is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago just half a block from where were saying there was this church, the 1:00 a.m. each church, traditional african-american church. that is where the inauguration church services took place for america's first black president, bill clinton. [laughter] now, all little nap here for you. things start off at the white house and move along pennsylvania avenue toward the capitol which is on the right. there is a traditional copy of the white house the takes place. it's a big deal on the days when there's a transition from one president to another. it began in 1961, net was a year or allow these pictures were made available. you don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy command at the sa
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:00pm EST
experiences on the united states commission on civil rights, set up by president eisenhower in the 1950s senate. this is about half an hour. >> host: on your screen now as a well-known face for c-span viewers. that is mary frances berry, professor university of pennsylvania and also the author of several books, where the university of pennsylvania to talk to her about this book, justice for all. united states commission on civil rights and continuing struggle for freedom in america. mary frances berry, when did the u.s. civil rights commission began and why? >> guest: well, the civil rights commission started in 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussions with john foster dulles, secretary of state about the way the united states is seen around the world because of the racism going on, that people would hear about and read about and the fact that there seemed to be a lot of episodes that kept happening, whether as lynching or some discrimination taking place in the country. so the idea was eisenhower said he was going to ask congress to set up a civil rights commission, which wou
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00am EST
commission begin? >> 1957. president eisenhower had a lot of discussion with john foster dulles the secretary of state because of the races around the world people would hear about and read about and the fact there seemed to be episodes whether lynching or discrimination in the country. eisenhower said he would ask congress to set up a civil-rights commission to put the facts on the table and i am told by someone at the meeting he slammed the table and they will put the facts on the table. policy is sometimes said up because there is a tough problem is that the report then they go away but in the future would depend on what it found out and how aggressive it was in the public thought about it. >>host: initially it was set up as a temporary commission? >>guest: right. the right age one year before the overall crisis. it was too diffuse part of the crisis to present a better image of the country to the world. if on the way they could recommend solutions, that would be great. >>host: who was the first commission? >>guest: to put people on there who would be respected. from the white ma
MSNBC
Nov 30, 2012 4:00pm PST
time ago. we'll talk about the days of eisenhower. this is "hardball," the place for politics. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ >>> house speaker john boehner, the aforementioned speaker, is now 1 for 20. he's finally named a woman, believe it or not, to serve as one of his chairs in the 20 house committees he oversees. congresswoman candice miller of michigan will chair the house administration committee, it's a big one. the republicans took a lot of heat after announcing the other 19 house committees will all be headed by, there they are, men. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] w
MSNBC
Nov 30, 2012 11:00pm PST
moderate. that was a long time ago. we'll talk about the days of eisenhower. this is "hardball," the place >>> house speaker john boehner, the aforementioned speaker, is now 1 for 20. he's finally named a woman, believe it or not, to serve as one of his chairs in the 20 house committees he oversees. congresswoman candice miller of michigan will chair the house administration committee, it's a big one. the republicans took a lot of heat after announcing the other 19 house committees will all be headed by, there they are, men. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." there's a reason mitt romney's team seemed confident in the days leading up to the election. remember how they were? their internal polls showed romney on the brink of victory. the electorate they told themselves existed bore little resemblance to the people who showed up to the polls. "the new republic" obtained the internal poll numbers from the romney camp in the days leading up to the november 6th election. in iowa the campaign's numbers showed them tied with obama. in reality obama beat romney by about 6 points.
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30am EST
evening in 1954, at the nixon's dinner it was president eisenhower was going to speak they came across an indian woman sitting on a bench outside the banquet hall perk no pat recognize the women and asked if he did. halfway down pat remember the woman and mater has been returned to where the woman sitting. passbook was a woman and asked her if they had not met previously. when the woman replied that they had, pat asked about her stay in the u.s. and inquired what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained that she was returning to india a few days and hope to catch it glimpse of the president before she went home. path and then arrange for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so that she could hear his speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to their previous engagement. i used to the story to begin my talk because i think it exemplifies several key points i was to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as foreign diplomat. first, pat met the indian woman during one of her travels the second lady. for
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:15am EST
eisenhower thinking the staff at the white house. at the same time, the incoming president that year, john f. kennedy and his wife jacqueline leaving the blair house getting ready for the big day. another thing that takes place on inauguration morning and this will happen is a religious service. when i was in washington with my wife a few years ago, just a half a block from where we were staying, there was this church called the first am church and that's where the services took place for america's first black president, bill clinton. [laughter] i have a little map for you. things start at the white house and they move along pennsylvania avenue toward the capitol which is on the right and there's a traditional copy of the white house that takes place and it's a big deal on the days when there's a transition from one prison to another. again, 1961 and that is when a lot of these pictures were made available. you just don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy together, and at the same time, you have the when women together and they were actually the four -- they were the
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 8:00am EST
we know names like gavin and eisenhower, the younger officers who were moved up because they were successful in this very hard darwinian process that marshall implemented and we lost in korea, vietnam and iraq. >> you bring up the example, and that clearly is some of context that informs the book although it is a real work of history going back to world war ii and up to the present day. you make the point that there's more accountability lower down the food chain than for our general officers now. >> it's called different spanks for different ranks. >> well, that's exactly right. [laughter] that's not in the book, i don't think so. [laughter] how many people are, have been held to account for the disastrous setbacks that the u.s. military had early on in the iraq war, the failure to see things going on? none, right? >> none really. the stunning thing to me is here's a good trivia question. who is the last army division commander relieved for combat ineffectiveness? as best as i can tell, it's major general james baldwin, commander of the division in 1971. since then generals have
CSPAN
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am EST
moderate, they arrange a meeting with eisenhower. president eisenhower meets with the governor. the governor says, i will let him do it. i will integrate the school. the governor goes out of the room and tells the press the opposite. the president dressed me down like a general dresses down a sergeant. that is what happened. eisenhower has to say, what am i going to do? eisenhower says to the governor of south carolina, what do i do? the governor was a moderate and had resigned from the supreme court. if you send in troops into arkansas, you'll have to reoccupy the south. public opinion for human-rights was exactly the opposite. the attorney general says to eisenhower, you have to send in troops. and he did. he took paratroopers from the 131st airborne. -- the 101st airborne . it has to be popular. he took those thousand troops deliberately chosen because they were the heroes of world war ii. every american knew that at the time. they put them on the airplanes and may take those children and that picture went around the world. fabulous. the supreme court said, absolutely, you do thi
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 12:00am EST
with eisenhower. so the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which i grew, and everything we did was in the shadow of that. so, i was curious about it. the bomb story does have another origin. the 1930s, had written a book about the scientist. but above all he mentioned this figure about henry wallace, and how he could have been president in 1944 but he was bumped by the political bosses. and that led, of course, to the '45 decision by truman and became the origin for a great documentary or movie, and at the tried. wrote a script. didn't work. but ten years later, that -- still teaching the class, and he -- we decided to go ahead and do a documentary about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned ultimately into a bigger -- our eyes were bigger than our stomachs and we tried for a 12-hour national security state story, from 1940s until now. actually we started in 1900, the philippine-american war. but -- spanish american war and ended up in 2012. but we started in the series now. the book two years into the series, we decided, this is getting very serious, and we know i'm going
MSNBC
Dec 26, 2012 4:00am PST
, including this phone call between president kennedy and general dwight d. eisenhower, discussing the cuban missile crisis. >> general, what about if the soviet union -- khrushchev -- announced tomorrow, which i think he will, that if we attack cuba, that it's going to be nuclear war? and what's your judgment as to the chances they'll fire these things off if we invade cuba? >> oh, i don't believe that they will. >> you don't think they will? in other words, you would take that risk if the situation seemed desirable? >> well, as a matter of fact, what can you do? if this thing is such a serious thing here on our flank, that we're going to be uneasy and we know what thing is happening now, all right, you've got to use something. >> yeah. >> something may make these people shoot them off. i just don't believe this will. >> yeah, right. >> in any event, of course, i'll say this. i'd want to keep my own people very alert. >> yeah, well, hang on tight. >> yes, sir. >> thanks a lot, general. >> all right. thank you. >> those are incredible. caroline kennedy joins us now. >> okay, let's forg
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:00pm EST
my father was republican and a conservative. he served in world war ii as eisenhower said the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which it grew and anything we did was in the shadow of that. so i was curious about it and the bomb story really does have another origin. the book about the scientist of the 30s and above all the mentioned this figure about henry wallace and how he could've been president in 1944 but he was bumped by the political bosses. that led of course to the 45 decision by truman. then we begin the origin of a great idea for a documentary or a movie and he wrote a script. it didn't work for me, but 10 years later it haunted me that story in washington and he is still teaching a class when i came back. we decided to go ahead and do it.mandari about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned into ultimately -- our eyes are bigger than our stomachs and we tried a 12 hour national security state story from the 1940s to now and it actually started in 1900 with the philippine american war but the spanish-american war and then in 2012, we started 1940 in the series
PBS
Dec 19, 2012 1:00am PST
. he's an eisenhower conservative. he's not a liberal. >> i agree 100 percent. i mean, obama has been -- i'm always shocked when people call obama a socialist, because he's -- in fact, i think you might be doing a disservice to eisenhower. >> and -- >> if i can choose to be grateful for my life, love the life i have in the midst of all this, then i can be grateful for other things. >> funding is provided by: carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 9:00pm EST
served in world war ii with eisenhower. so obama everything we did was in the shadow. i was curious about it. he said the story does have another origin and he went into the 1930's and he's written a book about the scientists but above all he mentioned a figure in 1944 he was bumped by the political bosses. and that led of course to the 45 decision by truman so now we begin the origin of the current idea for the documentary or movie and he wrote the script, it didn't work for me, but that story the other day he is still teaching the class and we decided to go ahead and do a documentary. not one hour turned into a bigger, our arms were bigger than our stomachs and i think we tried for 12 hours national security state story from 1940's to now in the expansionary war and ended up in 2012 but we started in the series now the book we decided this is getting very serious and we know i'm going to be called on this because of my background and this is part fiction and part fantasy. they were feeding all the time and choking each other constantly. >> from 1996 and we decided we were going to
MSNBC
Dec 22, 2012 3:00pm PST
you what we're looking at. at the last five two-term presidents, truemamen, eisenhow reagan, clinton and bush. let's put up the numbers. in truman's second term, let's look here. as you can see, in that midterm in the 1950s, the house lost 20 seats, the senate six. eisenhower, house lost 48 seats. 13 for the senate. reagan's 1986 re-election, house lost five seats in the house, and eight in the senate. president clinton is the big out-liar here if you recall, because he didn't lose anything. he gained five in the house for his party and staying even in the senate. president bush got hammered. republicans lost 30 seats in the house, six in the senate and control of both houses were gone from the republicans. the 1998 election was the only time a two-term president saw gains. in addition two-term presidents typically have one really bad midterm and one not so bad. truman was much worse in '46 than in '50. reagan, split decision after losing big in the house and gaining a senate seat in 1982, republicans lost seven seats in '86 and control, but did better in the house. so, let'
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
that i had been too much interested in politics before and eisenhower was the nominee in 1952. i remember being bid on eisenhower and my father was big on eisenhower. after that, i got into politics because i was fascinated by voting patterns. by the time the 1956 republican came around, i wasn't active kid -- i was an active kid. i was making maps county by county in different states on how they voted in presidential elections. when i wrote this book, the republican majority came out when i was 28, but i have been doing it for 12 or 14 years in terms of research. it is hard to believe. it was not terrific for my social life concentrating on all of this stuff. >> you married and have twins? >> that's right. >> how old are they? >> 37. >> and hal expert are they in the kinds of things that we are talking about? >> they are quite interested. one does political economics. the other consults on things that are fairly political and economic. so you can see that they sort of turned out to be -- i wouldn't say chips off the old block, but certainly in the same ballpark. >> where did you
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 4:35am EST
know arnie's army." president ronald reagan. and of course president eisenhower who did a lot for the game of golf. the story goes that eisenhower i asked to play the winner of the 1968 masters championship. that turned out to be arnold palmer. those 18 holes marked the beginning of a lasting friendship. welcome and thank you for being here, ladies and gentleman. [applause] >> ladies and gentleman, please stand for the presentation of the colors by the united states armed forces guard, the national anthem, and the retirement of the colors. ♪ >> present! >> ♪ o say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? and the rockets red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there o say does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? ♪ >> forward! ♪ >> ladies and gentlemen, please remain standing as the chaplain of the uni
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 7:30pm EST
another olympia and then 1989 is thecongress of white the eisenhower. -- eisenhower. popular sets. you are paying about $100 per set for them.then i will explain about this one in a minute. the only one where the half dollar is also2 silver this1 is the james madison5 commemorative54 and then9 the world cup commemoratives and in '95 the silvo commemorative. and the most valuable of all of these and if you go to www.hsn.com this set is $549 right here. i sell them all the time of that price. i sold them individually out in five minutes last night. $700 basically for those 2 sets. of them at $100 i sell them out in like two seconds. the most popular singles that i have is one right here.all in the original government packaging. around and you can see there isther olympic coin and now i am going to set this one down the call that the nolan ryan commemorative dollar. a living american on a u.s. government issue coin. baseball card c13 take thatand you match up against their any looking every fold in the uniform and shoelaces and a lace on the ball and head and arm and you tell me this is not t
MSNBC
Dec 12, 2012 10:00am PST
u.s. leaders, eisenhower and dullis debated what to do. eisenhower makes a tremendous speech, then two days later dullis rejects the premise of what eisenhower said and we go back to the intensified cold war. >> you know, we even know that from more contemporary american history, missed opportunities where there is outreach from various countries to the united states. we see it more recently. what about this clip, this relates to george orwell. >> george orwell once wrote, "who controls the past controls the future." by showing you the patterns of behavior which have come to be that you perhaps have not noticed before, we will try to bring you back to the meaning of this country and what's so radically changed after world war ii. this behavior has brought us to where we are now. this film is designed to enhance democratic values and institutions in our country. >> i had a mustache then. that was five years ago. >> you didn't shave it off because of our fundraising for epilepsy. >> no, it's been a long haul. this is a long one. >> you've worked for five years on this. >> there's a f
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
programs in the 1930s and many are still with us but when dwight eisenhower became president in 1953 he wanted to end those programs. this is roosevelt signing the act of 1934. when eisenhower was not busy playing golf he tried to do just that. he wanted to get the federal government out of the mortgage buying business. he proposed legislation to gradually transformed fannie mae from an agency into a privately-owned company. the idea was mortgage banks, the users of fannie mae gradually would buy shares in the company and the treasury would sell its shares. congress passed legislation, eisenhower signed it. you can see many thought was a good idea. there was one fatal flaw in his legislation. there was no deadline for fannie transform itself into a private company. so it didn't happen. in fact four years later in the midst of a housing slump congress ordered fannie mae to take on even more government-backed debt to finance more housing. it was the beginning of a pattern. whenever we had a housing crisis fannie mae was always going to be part of the solution. in essence fannie was a subs
CNN
Dec 10, 2012 5:00am EST
book. fdr's scottish terrier, falla, and the bull terrier, willy, and eisenhower also had a bull terrier. tell us about the dogs. >> falla is the most famous first dog in american history. if you see in the fdr memorial down in washington, d.c., you will see a statue erected of falla right next to president roosevelt. and falla was just a very engaging, wonderful dog. you know, scotties are, and he was always traveling with roosevelt. the only time he couldn't travel with roosevelt was right before the third inauguration. he jumped into the limousine, and roosevelt said you can't ride now, falla, and falla was taken out of the car, so eleanor could get in, and he ran off. he ran away from the white house, because he was so upset. but luckily they did find him at a nearby theater. they identified him because he was wearing his collar, which said falla, the white house. >> unmistakable, no doubt. anyone who has seen the movie "patton" is familiar with the bull terrier, willy, who played an important role. he was a real-life dog. >> actually, willy was the dog that inspired me to wr
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 3:00pm EST
world of trouble" published in 2009 by farrar, i wrote about american presidents from eisenhower to ford and how each tried to understand the middle east and how each tried to impose a surprisingly discontinuous agenda with often tragic results. and while that book is about america's political system, "fortress israel" is a biography of israel's political culture which is an undertaking one has to take -- make with humility as an american. going back to tel aviv over several years driving up the hill to jerusalem and up and down that mediterranean landscape, i became fascinated with how the generals and the intelligence chiefs and the political figures of the ruling elite look out at the world and how strong what i call a martial impulse beats in their chest and how self-assured they are in dealing with us, the superpower, as if they were the superpower in a relationship that would be reversed. and this book is, of course, not about the arabs who comprise the largest culture in the middle east. the arab states are responsible for their own substantial shortcomings on the peace front
CSPAN
Dec 2, 2012 6:00pm EST
about the eisenhower dollars? remember they are in proof condition that they were like the ones never released in circulation. '73 '74, the 2 bicentenial eisenhower dollars. they are all $160 out of this collection. the lincoln cent are $150. >>host: go back 78 it has never been outside of the box. this is how it was delivered. >>guest: 75, 76 77 78 that is the key. you get everyone of these just like the day they were made from the u.s. mint. only for about half the price you would pay from the mint today yet, you get a sold out limited edition proof-sets. it is of importance to understand their rarity and collectibility of these particular coin sets. the fact that they are extremely rare.they are extremely valuable and coins that positively more collectable with each passing day. do not confuse them with regular issue united states government coins. they are only available in the government issued sets that you see right here. these are the s-minted coins, san francisco minted that we have got here and the only way to gethem is this set which is why coin by coin they are $1,200! >>h
PBS
Dec 16, 2012 5:00pm PST
that fundamentally barack obama's pretty conservative. he really is. he's an eisenhower conservative. he's not a liberal. i mean, he's -- and i think that's one of the problems with the democratic party is they're looking for leadership to a guy on an issue like why aren't we creating jobs? why isn't there more aggregate demand in the economy? and it's because their guy doesn't really want it. >> i agree 100%. i mean, obama has been -- i'm always shocked when people call obama a socialist, because he's in fact, i think you might be doing a disservice to eisenhower. and even, you know, nixon is to the left of obama on many, on most social issues. i mean, nixon proposed a negative income tax, which everybody forgets about. and the other point is that this is reflected broadly in the democratic party, at least in the sort of elite level of democratic party. i mean, you know, i've seen people like, for example, gene sperling speak at conferences. >> former clinton economic advisor. >> right, he's now obama advisor. >> now obama -- >> and he for example, he talked about middleclass jobs.
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 11:00pm EST
eisenhower was having a long-term affair with an attractive young british driver named kay summersby l.. what general hires a young female model to be his aide if you will instead of a major captain or medal winner? imagine if eisenhower's affair came out during world war ii and its happen has happened with petraeus, what if we got rid of -- before d-day? franklin roosevelt was having affairs. franklin roosevelt had two very long-term affairs. one with missy lehand ,-com,-com ma his personal aide and secretary and cook and dresser-rand undress her apparently too. what if we found out about fdr's misbehavior and what if we threw fdr out of office as the economy was recovering? all the way back to the french and indian war, very young george washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. her name was sally terry fairfax, very attractive, older, sophisticated woman. what if washington letters have become public during the french and indian war or the revolutionary war? but just petraeus' e-mails became public and what if we got rid of george washington?
MSNBC
Dec 28, 2012 6:00am PST
looking at. at the last five two-term presidents. truman, eisenhower, reagan, clinton, and bush. we're including truman because even though he wasn't elected in 1944, he took over after fdr died just three months into his term. nixon is out before he resigned before the second midterm shellacking. let's put up the numbers. in truman's second term, let's take a look here, as you can see, in that midterm in 9050, his democratic party lost 28 seats in the house, 6 in the senate. in ike's second term in 1958, the gop got wiped out, losing 48 house seats, 13 senate seats. reagan, '86, republicans lost 5 seats in the house, 8 seats in the senate. i'll tell you about that in a minute. but it cost republicans control of the senate in the process. president clinton, of course, is the big outlier here, if you'll recall. he didn't lose anything in the second midterm, winning five house seats for his party, staying even in the senate. eight years later, president bush got hammered, losing 30 seats in the house, 6 in the senate, but control of both houses were gone from republicans. a couple things
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 10:45pm EST
true, for example earl warren, who certainly a great disappointment to dwight eisenhower. but what's fascinating to me at the moment is just a sotomayor. clearly, what is your view of where she is really going to come out on the. >> i'm sorry, but i just think that this idea that presidents are surprised and justices turn out differently is a myth. you know, that was the eisenhower presidency, which was a long time ago. there have not been surprises. you're absolutely right. it suffices to president eisenhower. since then, the number of surprises is very small. look at all nine justices on the current supreme court. >> as far as i can tell, she's going to be a solid liberal like the other for democratic appointees to the court. unless you see something that i don't see. i think she has taken a particular interest in the criminal docket. i think the fact that she was a federal district judge in actually dealt with cases in a non-academic sort of rough and tumble -- and has a tremendous amount of the court. >> part of my point is she's less political in my view. many of these cases tal
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am EST
think i had been too interested in politics before. eisenhower was the nominee in 1952. i remember being very big on eisenhower. and my father was very big on eisenhower. after that, i got into politics because i started getting fascinated by voting powers. by the time the 1956 republican campaign came around, i was an active kids osmose and all that. but i was already making maps county by county in different states of how they voted in presidential elections. when i wrote this book, "the emerging republican majority," it came out when i was 28, but i had been doing it 12 or 14 years in terms of research. hard to believe. it was not terrific for my social life to be concentrating on all this stuff. >> you married and have 10 children? >> that's right. >> how old are they? >> 37. chris paul interested in they are thi -- >> how interested are they in this? >> one does political consulting and another is in a related field. it turned out to be sort of i would not say chips off the old block but in the same ballpark. >> where did you learn how to write? >> i don't really know. i started wri
CNN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00pm PST
and generalize egenera generalizgeneral eisenhower made it the 6th. our job was to move out fast. >> enemy fire was very intense. very, very heavy casualties at the beach. 7,000 or 8,000 of our group was killed or wounded at that beach. there was a smell -- the smell of the exploding gun powder, and shortly afterwards the smell of people, bodies being torn apart, the smell of human flesh. it was an experience that any of us would have experienced this, and it was very difficult to keep from having recall that makes life difficult sometimes. those of us who survived are very thankful obviously. i know stories of comrades whose war was over that first day they were so badly injured or lost a limb or something like that. and their war was over. i try not to think too much about this all the time. you have to go on with life. we needed to move on to our primary objectives to be on the beach, and i was eventually assigned to one general's army. it was a warm welcome. the french were delighted. they flew flowers and kisses and so on. after the liberation of paris, our mission was to mo
MSNBC
Dec 24, 2012 12:00pm PST
. we show you what we're looking at. at the last five two-term presidents, truman, eisenhower, reagan, clinton and bush. truman, even though he wasn't elected in 1944, he took over after fdr took over five months in to his term. nixon is out before he resigned before the second midterm shallacking. you can see in that midterm in 1950, democratic party lost 28 seats in the house and 6 in the senate. in ike's second term, the democrats wiped out. 48 and 13 seats. reagan, 1986, eight and five seats. not so bad. more about that in a minute and did cost the republicans control of the senate in the process. president clinton is the big outlier here if you will recall. because he didn't lose anything in the second midterm. winning five house seats for the party. staying even in the senate and then president bush was hammered. republicans lost 30 seats in the house, 6 in the senate and more importantly control of the both houses were gone from the republicans. a couple things to note here. the 1998 election, of course, under president clinton marked the only time a sitting two-term president
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 243 (some duplicates have been removed)